Spring Fever: The gardening bug bites (March 1996)

By Linda Richmond The days have been warm and sunny, the crocus and daffodils are blooming, the elm trees bloomed weeks ago, and local gardeners have the urge to plant something. In the vegetable garden, peas, lettuce and carrots can go in now. Surveying my meager compost pile, I wondered if I could plant a … Continue reading Spring Fever: The gardening bug bites (March 1996)

Excerpt: A Traveler’s Guide to Monument Valley (1993)

Through numerous western movies and, more recently, a multitude of commercials and advertisements, millions of people from around the world readily recognize the monoliths of Monument Valley. Despite the region's incredibly diverse topography, ranging from yawning chasms to saw-toothed, alpine mountains, it is Monument Valley’s red sandstone buttes, mesas, and pinnacles that most people consider the quintessential image of the American Southwest.

Crossing Comb Ridge: The Utah Strip before paved roads (1996)

There is a narrow strip of land in southern Utah which stretches from East to West, from the Colorado border to Navajo Mountain. It is roughly bounded on the north by the San Juan River, and on the south by the Arizona state line. It is the frontier where American expansion ran aground in the muddy waters of the San Juan River. It is the northern edge of the Navajo Nation, whose boundaries have shifted as readily, and almost as often, as the sands of the river itself, since its establishment by the Treaty of 1868.

Lefty’s Soap Box: Spring planting, starting chiles, and other gardening tips (Feb. 1995)

Note: Lefty's Soap Box, a gardening column by former Canyon Echo editor Phil Hall, ran each month throughout the 1990s. If the weather keeps up like this February may become my favorite month. Good moisture, beautiful blue sky days, nights with crystal stars. During the week of the Presidents' birthdays we planted peas. The soil … Continue reading Lefty’s Soap Box: Spring planting, starting chiles, and other gardening tips (Feb. 1995)

One Hundred Years In Bluff (1997)

Very little has changed in this part of Bluff's landscape, as shown by these two photos, 100 years apart. Bluff residents gathered on Cemetery Hill, with Locomotive Rock in the background, in February to re-photograph scenes depicted in some of the historical photographs. Although the cemetery has gained a few additions, efforts are underway to … Continue reading One Hundred Years In Bluff (1997)

Ancient Basketmaker Pit Houses Excavated on White Mesa (1997)

Highway construction reveals ancestral Puebloan site Roadwork on U.S. Highway 191 south of Blanding this summer uncovered an Anasazi site consisting of four pit houses, two east of the highway and two west, and one other structure in the middle of the road bed. The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) had previously conducted surveys in … Continue reading Ancient Basketmaker Pit Houses Excavated on White Mesa (1997)

Searching for Common Ground on Wilderness: A Conversation with Scott Groene and Mark Maryboy (1997)

"Wilderness is a peculiarly western institution. The existence of the wilderness system is an elemental statement by this region of how it differs from other parts of the country, and of the world. Rough and open country matters here. Further, wilderness has a historical dimension... a stark reminder of the joys and barriers of a … Continue reading Searching for Common Ground on Wilderness: A Conversation with Scott Groene and Mark Maryboy (1997)

Bluff’s First Straw Bale Home (1997)

Straw Bale, Bluff Style "In communities throughout the country, Indian families are pioneering energy conservation and using renewable sources for energy--sun in the clear-skied southwest and wind in the blustery north. For Native people who have seen the earth and their own communities suffer from the exploitation of fossil fuels, it is deeply satisfying to … Continue reading Bluff’s First Straw Bale Home (1997)